Subject

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Introduction to Smartgrids

General details of the subject

Mode
Face-to-face degree course
Language
English

Description and contextualization of the subject

The course discusses the international and national development towards the futures renewable electric energy system, and the new concept of Smart Grid.

- The starting point is the understanding of the technical and economical context from the different invited experts coming from the industry. Integration of distributed and intermittent renewable energy requires a new paradigm, and the course gives a basis to understand and contribute to this development. Power systems, power electronics and renewable energy merge, for example in microgrids.

- A major part of the course concerns the optimal design of the microgrids, whether remote or interconnected with a main grid. The renewable resources and energy sources technologies together with their electrical characteristics are discussed, followed by the operation of a microgrid, including economic considerations and energy storage.



In the event that the sanitary conditions prevent the realization of a teaching activity and / or face-to-face evaluation, a non-face-to-face modality will be activated of which the students will be informed promptly.

Teaching staff

NameInstitutionCategoryDoctorTeaching profileAreaE-mail
ALDASORO MARCELLAN, UNAIUniversity of the Basque CountryProfesorado Adjunto (Ayudante Doctor/A)DoctorBilingualApplied Mathematicsunai.aldasoro@ehu.eus
VECHIU , IONELÉcole Superieure des Technologies Industrielles Avancées-ESTIADoctor

Competencies

NameWeight
Students should have updated knowledge about the advanced working techniques and methodologies related to the field of Smartgrids and distributed generation, particularly from the point of view of their control. 40.0 %
Awareness and application of the concepts and specifications of Smartgrids, their topologies, constituent components and basic dimensioning. 50.0 %
Students should be able to communicate about the projects carried out working in multidisciplinary and multilingual national and international teams of professionals and researchers operating in the field of Smartgrids. 10.0 %

Study types

TypeFace-to-face hoursNon face-to-face hoursTotal hours
Lecture-based81523
Applied classroom-based groups121527
Applied computer-based groups101525

Training activities

NameHoursPercentage of classroom teaching
Exercises25.040 %
Expositive classes10.0100 %
Solving practical cases25.040 %
Systematised study15.00 %

Assessment systems

NameMinimum weightingMaximum weighting
Practical tasks10.0 % 40.0 %
Questions to discuss5.0 % 20.0 %
Written examination30.0 % 70.0 %

Learning outcomes of the subject

- Knowledge: after completing the course, the student shall

o Understand the background for Smart Grid and have knowledge about important terminology

o Know about challenges and possibilities related to the energy market

o Have knowledge about technology for microgrids and integration of renewable energy and energy storage

o Have knowledge about different renewable energy sources and storage systems

o Have knowledge about SmartGrids concepts



- Skills: after completing the course, the student shall be able to

o Apply the knowledge as a basis for innovation in the energy sector

o Analyse and perform basic design of Smart Grid electric power systems, with emphasis on microgrids

Ordinary call: orientations and renunciation

Project 70%

Exam 30%



The final evaluation is done on an obligatory work based on a project (report).

Extraordinary call: orientations and renunciation

If there is a re‐sit examination, the examination form may change from written to oral

Temary

The course discusses the international and national development towards the futures renewable electric energy system, and the new concept of Smart Grid.

- The starting point is the understanding of the technical and economic context from the different invited experts coming from the industry. Integration of distributed and intermittent renewable energy requires a new paradigm, and the course gives a basis to understand and contribute to this development. Power systems, power electronics and renewable energy merge, for example in microgrids.

- A significant part of the course concerns the optimal design of the microgrids, whether remote or interconnected with the main grid. The renewable resources, energy sources technologies and storage systems together with their electrical characteristics are discussed, followed by the operation of a MicroGrid, including economic considerations.

Bibliography

Compulsory materials

Documentación de la página web de la asignatura. Accesible en: http://moodle.ehu.es/moodle

Basic bibliography

J. Ihamäki, Integration of microgrids into electricity distribution networks, 2012.



CERTS Program Office Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Integration of Distributed Energy Resources, California Energy Commission, The CERTS Microgrid Concept, 2003.



R. Zamora, A. K. Srivastava, Controls for microgrids with storage: Review, challenges, and research needs, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, vol. 14, no 7, p. 2009-2018, sept. 2010.



S. Abu-Sharkh, R. J. Arnold, J. Kohler, R. Li, T. Markvart, J. N. Ross, K. Steemers, P. Wilson, R. Yao, Can microgrids make a major contribution to UK energy supply, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, vol. 10, no 2, p. 78-127, apr. 2006.



N. Hatziargyriou, H. Asano, R. Iravani, C. Marnay, Microgrids, Power and Energy Magazine, IEEE, vol. 5, no 4, p. 78-94, 2007.



P. Piagi, R. H. Lasseter, Autonomous control of microgrids, 2006, p. 8.



J. M. Guerrero, J. C. Vasquez, J. Matas, L. G. de Vicuña, M. Castilla, Hierarchical Control of Droop-Controlled AC and DC Microgrids - A General Approach Toward Standardization, IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, vol. 58, no 1, p. 158-172, 2011.



B. Kroposki, R. Lasseter, T. Ise, S. Morozumi, S. Papatlianassiou, N. Hatziargyriou, Making microgrids work, IEEE Power and Energy Magazine, vol. 6, no 3, p. 40-53, 2008.



Marin, D., Intégration des éoliennes dans les réseaux électriques insulaires, Ecole Centrale de Lille, 2009.



C. A. Schiller, S. Fassmann, The Smart Micro Grid: IT Challenges for Energy Distribution Grid Operators, Generating Insights, p. 36-42.

In-depth bibliography

E. Koutroulis, D. Kolokotsa, A. Potirakis, K. Kalaitzakis, Methodology for optimal sizing of stand-alone photovoltaic/wind-generator systems using genetic algorithms, Sol. Energy, vol. 80, no 9, p. 1072-1088, sept. 2006.







S. M. Hakimi, S. M. Moghaddas-Tafreshi, Optimal sizing of a stand-alone hybrid power system via particle swarm optimization for Kahnouj area in south-east of Iran, Renew. Energy, vol. 34, no 7, p. 1855-1862, jul. 2009.







O. Ekren , B. Y. Ekren, Size optimization of a PV/wind hybrid energy conversion system with battery storage using simulated annealing, Appl. Energy, vol. 87, no 2, p. 592-598, feb. 2010.







A. H. Mantawy, Y. L. Abdel-Magid, S. Z. Selim, A simulated annealing algorithm for unit commitment, Ieee Trans. Power Syst., vol. 13, no 1, p. 197-204, 1998.







S. Diaf, D. Diaf, M. Belhamel, M. Haddadi, A. Louche, A methodology for optimal sizing of autonomous hybrid PV/wind system, Energy Policy, vol. 35, no 11, p. 5708-5718, nov. 2007.







D. B. Nelson, M. H. Nehrir, C. Wang, Unit sizing and cost analysis of stand-alone hybrid wind/PV/fuel cell power generation systems, Renew. Energy, vol. 31, no 10, p. 1641-1656, aug. 2006.



Journals

Energy Conversion and Management



Renewable Energy



Energy



IET Renewable Power Generation



IEEE Energy Conversion



IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid



Links

http://www.smartgrids-cre.fr



http://homerenergy.com/pdf/homergettingstarted268.pdf



http://pvsystwiki.wikispaces.com/file/view/Stand_Alone_PV_System_Using_PVSyst.pdf



http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2012/rncan-nrcan/M39-121-2005-fra.pdf

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