Subject

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Operations and maintenance of marine energy arrays

General details of the subject

Mode
Face-to-face degree course
Language
English

Description and contextualization of the subject

The module deals with a wide review of methodologies for a safe design of operations and maintenance activities for offshore facilities, applied to the specific issues related to the deployment of marine energy arrays. Different maintenance strategies will be defined and investigated; therefore the different operations along the lifecycle of the marine energy array and its subsystems (electrical subsystem, mooring and foundations, offshore devices) will be identified. Failure modes and a set of parameters for different components in each subsystem will be identified in order to assess the logistic requirements of each operation in terms of vessels and infrastructures, paying attention to reliability issues as well as costs and planning.

The students will learn methods for evaluating the site accessibility both in time domain and through probabilistic approaches and reporting (graphs) the outcomes of the operation and maintenance activities, achieving a better understanding of the economic viability of the projects

After attending the course, the students will be able to:

1. Analyse the different phases of development of a marine energy array (installation, maintenance, decommissioning, etc.¿) and identify failure modes, operations and subsequent logistics requirements;

2. Estimate hierarchy of the components within subsystems and related statistics (MTTF, MTTR and frequency) in order to inform the maintenance strategy (unplanned corrective, condition based maintenance, calendar based maintenance) and plan the operations consequently;

3. Use graphical tools for the representation of the operations and maintenance;

4. Provide an estimate of the site accessibility and availability of the array, in order to assess the reduction of power production due to O&M activities;

5. Provide figures of costs for operation and maintenance activities and evaluate their impact in the assessment of the viability of the project

Teaching staff

NameInstitutionCategoryDoctorTeaching profileAreaE-mail
ROBLES SESTAFE, EIDERUniversity of the Basque CountryProfesorado Asociado De UniversidadDoctorNot bilingualSystems and Automatic Engineeringeider.robles@ehu.eus
LOPEZ MENDIA, JOSEBATecnaliaOtrosjoseba.lopez@tecnalia.com
NAVA , VINCENZOFundación Tecnalia Research & InnovationOtrosDoctorvincenzo.nava@tecnalia.com
RODRIGUEZ ARIAS, RAULTecnaliaOtrosraul.rodriguezarias@tecnalia.com
RUIZ MINGUELA, JOSE PABLOTecnaliaOtrosjpablo.ruiz-minguela@tecnalia.com
VILLATE MARTINEZ, JOSE LUISTecnaliaOtrosjoseluis.villate@tecnalia.com

Competencies

NameWeight
Ability to understand the different maintenance strategies and failure modes for components20.0 %
Ability to handle different models for the estimation of the site accessibility of an array on a case-by-case basis20.0 %
Ability to solve real case studies in order to plan operation and maintenance activities for marine energy sector20.0 %
Ability to show and communicate properly the outcomes of an operation and maintenance planning20.0 %
Ability to estimate quantitative figures for evaluating the economic viability of a marine energy project20.0 %

Study types

TypeFace-to-face hoursNon face-to-face hoursTotal hours
Lecture-based101525
Seminar203050

Training activities

NameHoursPercentage of classroom teaching
Classroom/Seminar/Workshop20.0100 %
Exercises30.00 %
Expositive classes10.0100 %
Systematised study15.00 %

Assessment systems

NameMinimum weightingMaximum weighting
Attendance and participation30.0 % 50.0 %
Written examination50.0 % 70.0 %

Ordinary call: orientations and renunciation

The assessment of the course during the ordinary examination period will be based on the proactive attendance of the course, an individual multiple choice exam and a final group presentation:

• The Class attendance and active participation will count for a maximum of 50% and a minimum of 30 % of the total mark.

• An individual multiple choice test will count for a maximum of 40% and a minimum of 20% of the total mark.

• A group assignment and presentation on findings from the 3 tutorials will count for a maximum of 40% and a minimum of 20% of the final mark.

Extraordinary call: orientations and renunciation

The assessment of the course during the extraordinary examination period will be based on the proactive attendance of the course, an individual multiple choice exam and a final individual presentation:

• The Class attendance and active participation will count for a maximum of 50% and a minimum of 30 % of the total mark.

• An individual multiple choice test will count for a maximum of 40% and a minimum of 20% of the total mark.

• An individual presentation on findings from the 3 tutorials will count for a maximum of 40% and a minimum of 20% of the final mark.

Temary

Lesson 1 Operation planning & Economic Analysis of Operation and Maintenance costs : Theoretical Lectures

Lesson 2 Operation planning & Economic Analysis of Operation and Maintenance costs : Tutorial

Lesson 3 Failure modes, operations and maintenance strategies & Numerical methods for estimations

of failures and plant availability : Theoretical Lectures

Lesson 4 Failure modes, operations and maintenance strategies & Numerical methods for estimations

of failures and plant availability : Tutorial 1

Lesson 5 Failure modes, operations and maintenance strategies & Numerical methods for estimations

of failures and plant availability : Tutorial 2

Lesson 6 O&M strategies: Site Visit

Bibliography

Basic bibliography

For general concepts about offshore structures:

Chakrabarti, S.K., 2005a. Handbook of offshore engineering Vol. 1. Elsevier, Amsterdam

Chakrabarti, S.K., 2005b. Handbook of offshore engineering Vol. 2. Elsevier, Amsterdam

For offshore wind turbine, for example

Kaiser, M.J., Snyder, B.F., 2012. Offshore Wind Energy System Components, in: Offshore Wind Energy Cost Modelling. Springer London, London, pp. 13¿30.

For ocean energy systems, for example

Equimar Project, 2011. Sea Trial Manual (No. D4.1). Grant Agreement 213380.

For reliability issues

Kapur, K.C., Pecht, M. (Eds.), 2014. Reliability Engineering. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA.

Offshore standards and recommended practice

Det Norsk Veritas, 2011, Standard for Classification of Wind Turbine Installation Units, DNV-OS-J301

Det Norsk Veritas, 2011, Modelling and Analysis of Marine Operations, DNV-RP-H103

More information about operations and maintenance

V. Nava, P. Ruiz-Minguela, G. Perez-Moran, R. Rodriguez-Arias, J. Lopez-Mendia, and J.-L. Villate-Martinez, “Installation, operation and maintenance of offshore renewables,” Renew. Energy Oceans Wave Tidal Gradient Syst. Offshore Wind Sol., pp. 397–424, Jul. 2019, doi: 10.1049/PBPO129E_ch11.

Bengtsson, M., 2007. On condition based maintenance and its implementation in industrial settings.

Maples, B., Saur, G., Hand, M., van de Pietermen, R., Obdam, T., 2013. Installation, operation, and maintenance strategies to reduce the cost of offshore wind energy. NREL Denver.

Obdam, T., Braam, H., Rademakers, L., Van De Pieterman, R., 2011. O&M Cost Estimation & Feedback of Operational Data. INTECH Open Access Publisher.

Rademakers, L., Braam, H., Obdam, T.S., vd Pieterman, R.P., 2009. Operation and maintenance cost estimator (OMCE) to estimate the future O&M costs of offshore wind farms, in: Proc. of European Offshore Wind 2009 Conference, Stockholm, Sweden. pp. 14¿16.

Rausand, M., Høyland, A., 2004. System reliability theory: models, statistical methods, and applications. Wiley-Interscience, Hoboken, NJ.

SIS Förlag AB, Maintenance terminology - Svensk Standard SS-EN 13306. Stockholm, Sweden: Swedish Standard Institute, 2001.

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