25995 - Electronic Instrumentation

DESCRIPTION & CONTEXTUALISATION OF THE SUBJECT

The primary focus of Electronic Instrumentation is the development and implementation of electronic systems for the
purpose of measuring, monitoring and recording real-world physical phenomena (temperature, light, level, ...). So,
Electronic Instrumentation is a part of the electronic technology that deals with the conversion of the physical variables into
electrical ones, and their adequate electronic post-processing in order to give the correct information to a
control/monitorization system, a human operator or any combination of them.
Major uses of Electronic Instrumentation include industries that rely on automated process, such as chemical and
manufacturing plants. They depend on these devices for safety and for improving productivity and reliability. A very large
field of work is also offered in the automotive industries and domotic applications.
The scope of Electronic Instrumentation is vast and appears to be growing in part due to the increased use of automatic
control in manufacturing and processes plants. Growth is also tied to the development of more accurate and more robust
sensors, which allow us to detect the phenomena of interest with a much higher precision than what we could do a
generation ago.
Whatever may be the nature of the application, intelligent selection and use of measuring systems depends on a broad
knowledge of what is commercially available and how the performance of the equipment renders itself for the job to be
performed.
In the Electronic Instrumentation course circuits studied previously in "Industrial Electronics" course will be used, thus
broadening the knowledge of the design and technological applications of the electronic systems underlining specifically in
Electronic Instrumentation the electronic measurement of real world variables.

 

COMPETENCIES/LEARNING RESULTS FOR THE SUBJECT

Abilities:
- Applied knowledge of Electronic Instrumentation.
- To be able to design electronic systems related to Electronic Instrumentation.
Learning results:
- Knowledge of the electronic sensors most commonly used in monitorization and control systems.
- Analysis of the signal conditioning hardware (filtering and conditioning) of acquisition data systems.
- Evaluation of the instrumentation devices and selection of the most useful equipment for every application.
- Knowledge of the data acquisition systems based on digital systems to be able to understand its basis and be ready to
follow its technological evolution. Accordingly, to evaluate the different options in the selection of the most adequate
instrumentation system for a given application.
- Proper use of the laboratory equipment most commonly used in Electronic Instrumentation. Broad expertise using them
as a tool to analyze electronic circuits' response.

 

THEORETICAL/PRACTICAL CONTENT

Chapter 1: Introduction
In this chapter the important role that is played by sensors in the design of industrial electronic circuits is indicated.
Important issues in the practice of electronic instrumentation are identified. The steps of implementing a control system
with sensors and associated hardware are stated.

Chapter 2: Sensors
Sensors can detect, as electrical signals, changes in a vast array of physical variables. The steady spread of electronic
circuits into today’s life has greatly increased the importance of sensors. From an “Industrial Electronic
Engineering and Automation” point of view the most useful transducers used in industrial applications will be
profusely discussed. This coverage of sensors includes suggestions for choosing transducers and describes common
sensing methods for those used in the electronic systems.

Chapter 3: Signal conditioning
The improvement of the electrical signal acquired by the sensors is the key point of this chapter. Circuits used in
instrumentation systems, such as Wheatstone bridges, linearization devices and instrumentation amplifiers, are
emphasized in this chapter. Specific signal conditioning for specific transducers will be thoroughly studied as well.

Chapter 4: Active Filters
This chapter demonstrates how to design analog active filters (Butterworth response) capable of meeting a given set of
specifications. Four basic filter types (low-pass, high-pass, band-pass and notch) are implemented with the Sallen-Key
and State Variable circuits illustrating the methodology of filter design in complete detail.

Chapter 5: DAC y ADC. Acquisition data-systems.
The most widely used analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversions are studied in this chapter, including the use of
several commercially available ADC and DAC integradted circuits. Previously, the need of sample&hold and
reconstruction circuits is explained. Furthermore, commercial data acquisition systems are introduced underlining its
structure and most important characteristics.

Through the whole academic semester Laboratory Sessions will take place every two weeks. The nature of the laboratory
work is directly related to the aforementioned chapters.

 

METHODS

Several teaching/learning methodologies will be used through the semester. First, lectures on sensors and circuit design
will be given in a clear way, so that the student could learn and interiorize all the theoretical concepts involved in this
course. Second, a problem-solving learning methodology will be used as well. The problems (exercises, case-studies and
so on) will be solved in a participative way (in groups or individually). This way, students could go into detail about their
learning process and, therefore, this methodology allows the students to have a feedback for improving their performance
and skills in this course. In the Laboratory Sessions students will work in pairs and acquire experimental knowledge of the
discipline providing a learning method based on commonly used experimental procedures.

 

TYPES OF TEACHING

Type of teaching M S GA GL GO
Classroom hours 45     15  
Hours of study outside the classroom 67,5     22,5  

Legend: M: Lecture S: Seminario GA: Pract.Class.Work GL: Pract.Lab work GO: Pract.computer wo
GCL: Clinical Practice TA: Workshop TI: Ind. workshop GCA: Field workshop

 

ASSESSMENT SYSTEMS

- Continuous assessment system
- Final assessment system

TOOLS USED & GRADING PERCENTAGES

- Extended written exam 70%
- Practical work (exercises, case studies & problems set) 15%
- Team work (problem solving, project design) 15%

 

ORDINARY EXAM CALL: GUIDELINES & DECLINING TO SIT

The next evaluation method will be used in this first Call: a 70% of the final mark is linked to the final exam, a 15% to the
laboratory sessions and another 15% to the production of several assignments (handouts, short presentations, …).
It is mandatory to pass separately every one of the three aforementioned items (final exam, laboratory sessions and
assignments). If this condition is not true the student will fail the course (final mark = the worse mark of the three items). If
the condition is true, the final mark is the addition of the three items.
If some student DOESN'T SHOW to the laboratory sessions and/or DOESN'T DO the assignments in due time the student
will fail the course (regardless of the exam's mark) and the final mark will be 1 point.
The students could take a final assessment task evaluating all the abilities if they hand to the professor a signed
document during the first 9 weeks of the semester showing that they want to take a final assessment task. This final
assessment will consist of three parts: a) Individual report (15%) (they will be told about the nature of the individual report
when they hand the signed document), b) laboratory work assessment (15%) and c) final written exam (70%).
The no-showing to an examination sitting will be considered as a resignation (for both, the mixed evaluation method and
the final assessment task). Therefore, in this specific case the mark will be Not Shown.

 

EXTRAORDINARY EXAM CALL: GUIDELINES & DECLINING TO SIT

In this extraordinary Call the aforementioned criteria applied for the first Call will be used. That is: a) Individual report
(15%), b) laboratory work assessment (15%) and c) final written exam (70%).It is mandatory to pass separately every one of the three aforementioned items (final exam, laboratory sessions and assignments). If this condition is not true the student will fail the course (final mark = the worse mark of the items). If the condition is true, the final mark is the addition of the three items.
In case that the student passed items a) and /or b) in the first Call the marks related to that item(s) will be kept.
If some student DOESN'T SHOW to the laboratory sessions and/or DOESN'T DO the assignments in due time the student
will fail the course (regardless of the exam's mark) and the final mark will be 1 point.
The students could take a final assessment task evaluating all the abilities if they hand to the professor a signed document
during the first 9 weeks of the semester showing that they want to take a final assessment task. This final assessment will
consist of three parts: a) Individual report (15%) (they will be told about the nature of the individual report when they hand
the professor the signed document), b) laboratory work assessment (15%) and c) final written exam (70%).
The no-showing to an examination sitting will be considered as a resignation (for both, the mixed evaluation method and
the final assessment task). Therefore, in this specific case the mark will be Not Shown.

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Basic bibliography

- Pérez M. A., Álvarez J. C., Campo J. C., Ferrero F. J., Grillo G. J., Instrumentación Electrónica, Ed. Thomson, 2004.
- Pallas Areny R., Sensores y acondicionadores de señal, Ed. Marcombo, 1998.
- J. Díaz, J. A. Jiménez y F. J. Meca, Introducción a la electrónica de medida, Univ. de Alcalá, 1998.
- M. H. Rashid, Circuitos microelectrónicos. Análisis y Diseño, Ed. Thomson, 2002.

In-depth bibliography

- Fraden J., Handbook of Modern Sensors: Physics, designs and applications, Ed. Springer, EEUU, 2003
- S. A. Pactitis, Active filters. Theory and design, CRC Press, 2008
- W. de Silva, Sensors & Actuators, CRC Press, 2007

Journals

- IEEE Instrumentation & Measurement, Magazine (IEEE)

Useful websites

- www.sensorsportal.com
- www.sensorsmag.com
- www.ti.com
- www.amidata.es
- es.farnell.com
- www.ni.com
- www.circuitcellar.com
- www.ieee-ims.org