About QUINST

Quantum mechanics is at the heart of our technology and economy - the laser and the transistor are quantum devices - but its full potential is far from being realized. Recent technological advances in optics, nanoscience and engineering allow experimentalists to create artificial structures or put microscopic and mesoscopic systems under new manipulable conditions in which quantum phenomena play a fundamental role.

Quantum technologies exploit these effects with practical purposes. The objective of Quantum Science is to discover, study, and control quantum efects at a fundamental level. These are two sides of a virtuous circle: new technologies lead to the discovery and study of new phenomena that will lead to new technologies.

Our group's aim is  to control and understand quantum phenomena in a multidisciplinary intersection of  Quantum Information, Quantum optics and cold atoms, Quantum Control, Spintronics, Quantum metrology, Atom interferometry, Superconducting qubits and Circuit QED and Foundations of Quantum Mechanics.

 

 

Latest events

Felix Huber, University of Siegen, Germany ( Seminar)

Date

  • Start: 07/07/2016

Description

S eminar talk by Felix Huber, University of Siegen, Germany,
on Thursday, 7 July, 2016, at 12:00 in the seminar room of the Department of Theoretical Physics.

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Characterizing ground and thermal states of few-body Hamiltonians
Felix Huber, University of Siegen, Germany

The question whether a given quantum state is a ground or thermal state of a few-body Hamiltonian can be used to characterize the complexity of the state and is important for possible experimental implementations.  We provide methods to characterize the states generated by two- and, more generally, k-body Hamiltonians as well as the convex hull of these sets. This leads to new insights into the question which states are uniquely  determined by their marginals and to a generalization of the concept of entanglement. Finally, certification methods for quantum simulation can be derived.