Subject

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Research Seminar in Formal Linguistics II: Latest Developments

General details of the subject

Mode
Face-to-face degree course
Language
English

Description and contextualization of the subject

This subject is designed to allow students interested in formal linguistics to deepen their knowledge on the most recent theoretical proposals that attempt to provide answers to the central problems of the different sub-disciplines of theoretical linguistics, which will allow students to do research with a theoretical preparation of the highest level.

In the 2020-21 academic year, this class offers an accessible introduction to the concept of sound change and the different phonological processes it encompasses, using examples from a wide range of languages which can be adapted to the particular interests of the attending students. Several typologies of phonetically natural sound change will be discussed and compared in order to present a comprehensible outline of how the sounds of the world’s languages change over time.

Teaching staff

NameInstitutionCategoryDoctorTeaching profileAreaE-mail
ELORDIETA ALCIBAR, GORKAUniversity of the Basque CountryProfesorado AgregadoDoctorBilingualGeneral Linguisticsgorka.elordieta@ehu.eus
EGURTZEGI MARTINEZ, ANDERTechnical University of MunichOtrosDoctor** n o c o n s t a e l a r e a * ó " á r e a p r o v i s i o n a l"egurtzegi@phonetik.uni-muenchen.de

Competencies

NameWeight
Capacidad para comprender las motivaciones de los cambios en los modelos teóricos.20.0 %
Capacidad de interpretar y evaluar las diferencias y las similitudes entre los diferentes modelos teóricos.20.0 %
Ser capaz de aplicar las últimas propuestas teóricas en el campo de la lingüística formal en la investigación desarrollada.20.0 %
Ser capaz de presentar de manera estructurada, tanto oralmente como por escrito, sus conclusiones en torno a un problema avanzado relacionado con los temas tratados en el curso.20.0 %
Ser capaz de construir hipótesis nuevas a partir de la comparación e interpretación crítica de hipótesis ya existentes.20.0 %

Study types

TypeFace-to-face hoursNon face-to-face hoursTotal hours
Lecture-based18018
Applied classroom-based groups12012
Applied computer-based groups04545

Training activities

NameHoursPercentage of classroom teaching
Exercises20.050 %
Expositive classes20.0100 %
Readings35.00 %

Assessment systems

NameMinimum weightingMaximum weighting
Attendance and participation30.0 % 60.0 %
Continuous evaluation40.0 % 70.0 %

Temary

1. Introduction to variation and historical change

2. Neogrammarian sound change

3. Kinds of sound change

4. Modern typologies of sound change

5. Phonetic motivation in sound change

6. Models of linguistic diversification

7. Phases of sound change

The evaluation system below is designed for face-to-face teaching and will be adapted in the event that we enter a new state of health emergency and have to go to virtual teaching. In this case, the updated version of the program and the new evaluation system will be posted in the Egela virtual classroom.

Bibliography

Compulsory materials

Blevins, J. 2015. Evolutionary Phonology: A holistic approach to sound change typology. In P. Honeybone and J. Salmons (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Historical Phonology. Oxford: OUP, 485-500.

Blevins, J., A. Egurtzegi & J. Ullrich. 2020. Final obstruent voicing in Lakota: Phonetic evidence and phonological implications. Language 96, 294-337.

Harrington et al. 2019. Phonetic change in an Antarctic winter. JASA 146, 3327-3332

Harrington et al. 2019. The phonetic basis of the origin and spread of sound change. W. Katz & P. Assmann (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Phonetics, 401-426.

Labov, W. 2007. Transmission and diffusion. Language 83, 344-387.

Labov, W. 2020. The regularity of regular sound change. Language 96, 42-59.

Ohala, J.J. 1993. The phonetics of sound change. In C. Jones (ed.), Historical Linguistics: Problems and Perspectives. London: Longman, 237-278.

Sonderegger, M., M. Bane & P. Graff. 2017. The medium-term dynamics of accents on reality television. Language 93, 598-640.

Weinreich, U., W. Labov & M. Herzog. 1968. Foundations for an empirical theory of language change. In W.P. Lehmann & Y. Malkiel (eds.), Directions for historical linguistics. Austin: The University of Texas, 95-188.

Basic bibliography

Blevins, J. 2015. Evolutionary Phonology: A holistic approach to sound change typology. In P. Honeybone and J. Salmons (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Historical Phonology. Oxford: OUP, 485-500.

Blevins, J., A. Egurtzegi & J. Ullrich. 2020. Final obstruent voicing in Lakota: Phonetic evidence and phonological implications. Language 96, 294-337.

Harrington et al. 2019. Phonetic change in an Antarctic winter. JASA 146, 3327-3332

Harrington et al. 2019. The phonetic basis of the origin and spread of sound change. W. Katz & P. Assmann (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Phonetics, 401-426.

Labov, W. 2007. Transmission and diffusion. Language 83, 344-387.

Labov, W. 2020. The regularity of regular sound change. Language 96, 42-59.

Ohala, J.J. 1993. The phonetics of sound change. In C. Jones (ed.), Historical Linguistics: Problems and Perspectives. London: Longman, 237-278.

Sonderegger, M., M. Bane & P. Graff. 2017. The medium-term dynamics of accents on reality television. Language 93, 598-640.

Weinreich, U., W. Labov & M. Herzog. 1968. Foundations for an empirical theory of language change. In W.P. Lehmann & Y. Malkiel (eds.), Directions for historical linguistics. Austin: The University of Texas, 95-188.

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