Plenary speakers

Eric Chauvet

"Litter decomposition in streams: a 30-yr retrospective with a focus on B-EF relationships and grounds for future applications"

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Eric Chauvet

Dr. Chauvet has been head of two research units (80 permanent staff) attached to the French CNRS and the Université Paul Sabatier (Toulouse, France). Within EcoLab, E. Chauvet examines the diversity and function of benthic microbial communities. He has been working on the diversity of aquatic fungi, their role in leaf litter breakdown and organic matter dynamics in stream ecosystems for 30 years. He is especially interested in the evaluation of various anthropogenic impacts on the decomposition of leaf litter and related biodiversity issues. He has coordinated several national and international projects like the EU-funded RivFunction, aiming at assessing the functional stream integrity using leaf decomposition as a key process and the interplay between decomposers diversity and decomposition patterns and rates, and more recently the ANR-funded FunctionalStreams dedicated to the interacting impacts of global change drivers on headwater streams. He has led a project on the influence of forest management on litter breakdown and the diversity of macroinvertebrate and microbial decomposers in woodland streams. He was involved in the national project InBioProcess (Linking Biodiversity and ecological processes in the subsurface/surface water interfaces for sustainable groundwater management) and the EU/ESF-project BioCycle (Biodiversity and biogeochemical cycles: a search for mechanisms across ecosystems). He has published 106 papers in ISI-referenced journals in ecology and limnology and contributed to 7 book chapters; he has given >160 communications in national and international congresses and symposia. He has organized PLPF4 (4th international meeting on Plant Litter Processing in Freshwaters) in Toulouse in 2005.


Verónica Ferreira

"Stream functioning under forest change: still heterotrophic but not the same'"

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Verónica Ferreira

Verónica Ferreira completed her PhD degree in Biology from the University of Coimbra in 2007. Between 2007 and 2012 she did a postdoc at IMAR/University of Coimbra and EcoLab/CNRS, Toulouse, to evaluate the effects of global change on stream communities and ecosystem function. Afterwards (2012 – 2015), she did a postdoc at IMAR/University of Coimbra and School of Biological Sciences/Royal Holloway University London to evaluate the effects of global change on ecosystem function by mean of meta-analysis. Verónica is now an auxiliary researcher at the University of Coimbra, where she is assessing the effects of invasion of native forests by N-fixers on stream ecosystems.

 

 


Scott D. Tiegs

"Drivers and Effects of Organic-matter Processing in Freshwaters from Local to Global Scales"

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Scott D. Tiegs

Geographically separate ecosystems are often ecologically connected by flows of carbon and nutrients. Rivers receive nitrogen subsidies from the Pacific Ocean in the form of migrating salmon; streams receive carbon from autumn-shed riparian leaves; riparian soils receive riverine sediments during flood events. Do human activities alter these connections? And if so, what are the ecological consequences? To answer these types of questions, Dr. Tiegs employs field-based experimental and observational approaches, usually in aquatic ecosystems, with the aim of better understanding how human activities impact aquatic ecosystems, and how undesired effects can be ameliorated through ecological restoration. Dr. Tiegs is Associate Professor at the Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, where he teaches several courses of Ecology and River Ecology.